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Description

A classic, all-purpose fig. Fruit is delicious fresh and in preserves. Dried figs make tasty snacks all year long. Tree needs protection when temperatures drop below 10ºF. Needs minimal pruning. May yield 2 distinct crops in locations with a long, warm growing season. Grows well in containers! Heat-tolerant. Ripens in June. Self-pollinating.

Characteristics

Fruit Color Brown
Fruit Size Small - Medium
Pollination Self-pollinating
Ripens/Harvest June
Shade/Sun Full Sun
Soil Composition Loamy
Soil Moisture Well Drained
Soil pH Level 6.0 - 6.5
Taste Mild, Sweet
Texture Fleshy, Soft
Years to Bear 1 - 2
Zone Range 5 - 9

Zone Compatibility

This Variety's Zone Range 5 - 9
My Hardiness Zone ?
The USDA hardiness zones offer a guide to varieties that will grow well in certain climates. Each zone corresponds to the minimum winter temperatures experienced in a given area. Make sure that your hardiness zone lies within the zone compatability range of this variety before ordering.

Size & Spacing

Mature Size

When your tree matures, it will be approximately 10 - 20' tall x 10 - 20' wide.

Recommended Spacing

We recommend spacing these trees 10 - 20' apart to ensure room for growth.

Recommended Pollinators

This variety is self pollinating.

In many cases, you may still want to plant pollinating partners to increase the size of your crops, but with self-pollinating varieties doing so is optional. You'll get fruit with only one plant!

Tools & Supplies

Having the proper tools and supplies when growing your own can make the difference between a good harvest and a great harvest! Here's a list that our experts recommend for this variety.

Planting & Care

Learn all about how to grow fig trees in The Growing Guide. An entire section of our website dedicated to your growing success.

Shipping Information

Estimated Delivery Date

You don't pay until it ships.

We work hard to make sure that your order arrives at the ideal time for planting in your location. That's why we only ship living products during certain times of the year. Order now and your credit card won't be charged until your climate is suitable for planting success and your order is shipped.

Our Promise of Satisfaction

1 Year Warranty

Every order comes with our promise of satisfaction. If you aren't completely satisfied with your order, let us know within one year for a free one-time replacement or refund.

Questions & Answers

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Browse 5 questions Browse 5 questions and 14 answers
Why did you choose this?
Stark Bro's Store
My mom had this tree. I loved to pick them fresh from the tree. They are delicious.
Zardrelle A on Mar 30, 2016
Because I have a fig tree currently and I enjoy them.
John D on Mar 12, 2016
My mom had this tree. I loved to pick them fresh from the tree. They are delicious.
Zardrelle A on Mar 30, 2016
My Grandma had a Brown Turkey Fig, Finally I will have one too!
Sabrina L on Mar 15, 2016
Because I have a fig tree currently and I enjoy them.
John D on Mar 12, 2016
Love figs and we seldom get fresh ones here in CO
Suzanne R on Mar 11, 2016
We had a little fig tree when I was a kid. The taste is delicious !!
Curtis C on Feb 20, 2016
My Grandma had a Brown Turkey Fig, Finally I will have one too!
Sabrina L on Mar 15, 2016
Love figs and we seldom get fresh ones here in CO
Suzanne R on Mar 11, 2016
Blurb says it grows well in containers, but size given is 20 feet x 20 feet. Which is correct?
DONNA A on Apr 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: I have the Chicago hardy and the Turkey fig. They are only a couple years old and grew about 18 inches taller in the two large pots I have for them. The pots I have them in are approximately 7 gallons in size and they developed a good root system quickly last Summer. I plan on letting them grow to about 6 feet in height and then trim them back to contain their size. I have seen Figs out west that were 12 feet high and about the same spread which were growing outside in a permanent position. I believe you can keep them smaller and producing inside if you train them somewhat like a bonsai specimen , just not quite as extreme. I have experience with bonsai and feel this will work for me as I probably can't plant them out in my zone 5b and expect the top of the tree to not be killed back to the ground. They do seem quite vigorous and adaptable so try this if you think your situation may be similar.
Good growing,
Bill D.
Stark Bros. highly satisfied customer
Can a fig tree be moved to a new location?
Vida L on Apr 4, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Yes! MOST fig trees, that is. There are some, like the house plant "ficus" that my ddrp a lot of leaves if moved. However, most fig trees can be moved if done while they're young. You must get the entire root system, however, or the tree will suffer some what. Best time to move would be in late January or early February. Any other time of year, and the tree will suffer the move.
My figs are not so sweet. What can I add to the soil for sweeter brown turkey figs?
Richard on Mar 27, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Do not pick the fruit early. Pick in the morning they start to droop. I don't do anything special with the soil. In the winter, the figs get my wood ash mixed in when I wrap them.
My turkey brown fig tree smells like cat urine. Is this normal? Can I grow in the house?
Lisa A on May 1, 2016

Customer Reviews

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Prolific, cold sensitive
We have had two of these trees for about five years. One grows large and the other remains small. They are cold sensitive and will die to the ground if unprotected when the temperature gets to 15 F, which is reached most winters in Cincinnati. Simply wrapping them in burlap is not adequate. What does work is wrapping in burlap, then surrounding with leaves held in place with a wire cage. The large tree is very prolific and is relatively hard to protect from squirrels and birds; because the tree is relatively tall (15 feet), netting is difficult and not very squirrel protective. We end up sharing with the critters. Fortunately, our several urban deer do not chew on them.
March 10, 2016
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