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Estimated Yield for Fruit Trees

For growers with enough space, where tree size isn't an issue, this guide covers the estimated yield of dwarf, semi-dwarf, and standard size fruit trees.

If you are limited on space, dwarf fruit trees have obvious benefits beyond estimated yield.

Estimated Fruit Yield by Tree Size

The information below represents an average yield for fruit trees.*

Apple Trees

  • Miniature: 1/4–1 bushel
  • Dwarf: 1–4 bushels
  • Semi-Dwarf: 5–10 bushels
  • Standard: 10–20 bushels

Apricot Trees

  • Dwarf: 1–3 bushels
  • Standard: 3–6 bushels

Cherry Trees

Sour Varieties

  • Dwarf: 15–20 quarts
  • Semi-Dwarf: 20–60 quarts

Sweet Varieties

  • Dwarf: 15–20 quarts
  • Semi-Dwarf: 30–50 quarts
  • Standard: 60–75 quarts (~3 bushels)

Nectarine Trees

  • Miniature: 1/4–1 bushel
  • Dwarf: 2–3 bushels
  • Standard: 3–5 bushels

Peach Trees

  • Miniature: 1/4–1 bushel
  • Dwarf: 1–3 bushels
  • Standard: 3–6 bushels

Pear Trees

Asian Varieties

  • Dwarf: 2–3 bushels
  • Standard: 4–6 bushels

European Varieties

  • Dwarf: 1–3 bushels
  • Standard: 3–6 bushels

Plum Trees

Japanese Varieties

  • Dwarf: 1/2–2 bushel
  • Standard: 2–4 bushel

European Varieties

  • Dwarf: 1–2 bushel
  • Standard: 3–6 bushels

Quince Trees

  • Dwarf: ~1/2 bushel
  • Standard: ~1 bushel

* Please note that this list should only be used as an estimation tool to help with future expectations — it is by no means a guarantee. Planting location, weather, care and maintenance, tree maturity, varietal vigor/nature, and other variables all contribute to the overall yield, so this information is merely a guide. If your mature fruit trees have produced differently, please feel free to share in detail for other readers in the comments.


Discover How Long it Takes Different Trees to Bear Fruit »

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